A Different Loop to the Tripyramids, 10.10.14

This hike came about by chance as BigEarl was looking for some company for some weekend hikes.  I had Friday free, and out of the choices for peakbagging, the Tripyramids worked for both of us even though I’d been to the Tripyramids two weeks prior.  That was September and it is now October; new month, new list. 😉  Since we had two vehicles, a loop hike was agreed upon, using Pine Bend Brook Trail up, and Sabbaday Brook Trail down.  I’d never been on Sabbaday Brook Trail, and BigEarl said he hadn’t done it in a while.   There were some good reasons to do the loop.

We met up at Lincoln Woods and then drove further up the Kancamagus Highway to get the vehicles at the start and finish of the hike.  Once on trail, the hike started nice and cool – hats and gloves needed.  This was a preview of my hike the next day, where I’d definitely need those things!  We headed up the trail, and were able to enjoy the yellow birches against the bright blue sky – some of the last leaves on the trees.

Blue sky, yellow leaves, fall is here!

Blue sky, yellow leaves, fall is here!

After passing the Wilderness Boundary, about two miles into the hike, we made our last brook crossing and started up the steep section of the ravine.  Every once in a while, we’d get a glimpse out behind us and know we were making progress as we hiked upward.  Pushing on, we came to the Scaur Ridge Trail junction where we had a nice break for the last steep section to the top.

Junction with the Scaur Ridge Trail in the morning light.

Junction with the Scaur Ridge Trail in the morning light.

The next section was much rockier and has some larger slabs, but we negotiated them fairly easily and came to the summit rocks of North Tripyramid, ready for another short break and to check out the viewpoint.  We could see Washington through the trees, and it was already white.  Snow or rime, we wondered.  After discussion, we settled on rime.  This was of interest to me, seeing that Washington was my destination for the next day’s hike.  (By the way, yes, it was rime ice!)

View of Mt. Tecumseh from the viewpoint near Middle Tripyramid.

View of Mt. Tecumseh from the viewpoint near Middle Tripyramid. The trees are less vibrant than two weeks ago.

We moved on, enjoying the easy ridge hiking over to Middle Tripyramid, where we took in the views, got our summit photos and were on our way back to the junction with the Sabbaday Brook Trail.  From here, the redlining fun would begin, as I’d never been on this trail.  The trail descriptions give you an idea of what to expect, but there is always something intriguing about a new trail and what is around the next bend.  The top section of Sabbady Brook Trail is steep.  In some places, very steep as it descends over what looked to be an old slide.  That section was pretty short, but as soon as we were down that section, the trail became much, much easier and continued that way for the rest of the hike.  We looked back and could see the ridge line and we surprised at how much elevation we’d actually dropped.

Steep slabs on the upper portion of Sabbaday Brook Trail.

Steep slabs on the upper portion of Sabbaday Brook Trail.

More steepness in the upper portion of the Sabbaday Brook Trail.  It was hard to accurately photograph how steep the trail is.

More steepness in the upper portion of the Sabbaday Brook Trail. It was hard to accurately photograph how steep the trail is.

We continued down the valley, with the Fool Killer on our left, crossing and recrossing the brook many times in the process.  It was hard to keep track of how many times, but we both knew that we need to end up the left bank, with the stream on the right when we got close to the parking area.  We only saw one couple all day, high up on the ridge.  The next person we saw, we were pretty sure they hadn’t hiked very many miles considering their clothing and lack of gear.  That only led us to conclude that we were pretty close to the parking area for Sabbaday Falls (the trail head and also a tourist attraction).  Sure enough, not 15 minutes later, we were at the vehicle, done with our hike and ready for the trip home.

One last look up to the ridge we have traveled on earlier in the hike.

One last look up to the ridge we have traveled on earlier in the hike.

It was nice relaxing day out with BigEarl, who I hadn’t hike with since last winter.   It was really nice day to enjoy some familiar peaks, new trail and good company.

 

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6 thoughts on “A Different Loop to the Tripyramids, 10.10.14

  1. Very nice report and photos, Summerset!

    The Sabbaday Brook Trail is one that I’ve hiked only once. I recall it being much as you described it. Also, I seem to remember taking a herd path workaround to avoid a brook crossing somewhere along the route.

    And yes, regarding your photo caption saying how difficult it is “to accurately photograph how steep the trail is”, I know exactly what you mean. It can be very challenging to portray “steepness” in a photo. I’ve had the same issue!

    John

    • Thanks for stopping by, John! It did look like there might be some herdpaths along Sabbaday Brook, but we didn’t take any – with all the leaves it was easier just to stay on the marked trail. Plus, I was redlining, can’t miss any trail doing that! LOL!

    • We tried counting and did get to six, but that was before the end. Either that or we lost count somewhere, which is very likely, too. It looked like there might have been some rearranging due to Irene, too, especially down low on the trail closer to the falls, so maybe there are a few more crossings now?

  2. Oh, and to indicate steepness the classic technique is to photograph to the left or right of the trail, not up or down it. That way the angle between the trees and the trail is more obvious.

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